Grab Bags


List of minerals you can find in our educational Grab Bags and Geology Kits

 

Agate

Agate

Agate

Agate (pronounced /ˈæɡət/) is a micro-crystalline variety of quartz (silica), chiefly chalcedony, characterized by its fineness of grain and brightness of color. Although agates may be found in various kinds of rock, they are classically associated with volcanic rocks but can be common in certain metamorphic rocks.

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Amazonite

Amazonite

Amazonite

Amazonite is a mineral of limited occurrence. Formerly it was obtained almost exclusively from the area of Miass in the Ilmen mountains, 50 miles southwest of Chelyabinsk, Russia, where it occurs in granitic rocks. More recently, high-quality crystals have been obtained from Pike’s Peak, Colorado, where it is found associated with smoky quartz, orthoclase, and albite in a coarse granite or pegmatite.

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Amethyst Quartz

Amethyst Quartz

Amethyst Quartz

Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry. The name comes from the Ancient Greek ἀ a- (“not”) and μέθυστος methustos (“intoxicated”), a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness; the ancient Greeks and Romans wore amethyst and made drinking vessels of it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication.

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Biotite Mica 

Biotite Mica

Biotite Mica

Biotite is a sheet silicate. Iron, magnesium, aluminium, silicon, oxygen, and hydrogen form sheets that are weakly bond together by potassium ions. It is sometimes called “iron mica” because it is more iron-rich than phlogopite. It is also sometimes called “black mica” as opposed to “white mica” (muscovite) – both form in some rocks, in some instances side-by-side.

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Flint

Flint

Flint

Flint (or flintstone) is a hard, sedimentary cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz, categorized as a variety of chert. It occurs chiefly as nodules and masses in sedimentary rocks, such as chalks and limestones. Inside the nodule, flint is usually dark grey, black, green, white, or brown in color, and often has a glassy or waxy appearance.

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Fuschite

Fuschite

Fuschite

Muscovite is the most common mica, found in granites, pegmatites, gneisses, and schists, and as a contact metamorphic rock or as a secondary mineral resulting from the alteration of topaz, feldspar, kyanite. The green, chromium-rich variety is called fuchsite.

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Gypsum

Gypsum

Gypsum

Gypsum is a common mineral, with thick and extensive evaporite beds in association with sedimentary rocks. Deposits are known to occur in strata from as early as the Permian age. It is often associated with the minerals halite and sulfur.

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Hematite

Hematite

Hematite

Hematite is a mineral, colored black to steel or silver-gray, brown to reddish brown, or red. It is mined as the main ore of iron. Varieties include kidney ore, martite (pseudomorphs after magnetite), iron rose and specularite (specular hematite). While the forms of hematite vary, they all have a rust-red streak. Hematite is harder than pure iron, but much more brittle.

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Mica

Amber MIca

Amber MIca

The mica group of sheet silicate (phyllosilicate) minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. All are monoclinic with a tendency towards pseudo-hexagonal crystals and are similar in chemical composition. The highly perfect cleavage, which is the most prominent characteristic of mica, is explained by the hexagonal sheet-like arrangement of its atoms.

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Perthite

perthite

Perthite

Perthite is used to describe an intergrowth of two feldspars: a host grain of potassium-rich alkali feldspar includes exsolved lamellae or irregular intergrowths of sodic alkali feldspar (near albite in composition).

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Plagioclase

Plagioclase

Plagioclase

Plagioclase is an important series of tectosilicate minerals within the feldspar family. Rather than referring to a particular mineral with a specific chemical composition, plagioclase is a solid solution series, more properly known as the plagioclase feldspar series. Anorthite was named by Rose in 1823 from the Greek meaning oblique, referring to its triclinic crystallization. Anorthite is a comparatively rare mineral but occurs in the basic plutonic rocks of some orogenic calc-alkaline suites.

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Red Mica Adventurine

Red Mica Aventurine

Red Mica Aventurine

Aventurine is a soft green semi-translucent to mostly opaque stone with mica flecks. Aventurine also comes in silvery, yellow, reddish brown, greenish-brown, bluish green and orange. It contains inclusions of small crystals that reflect light and give a range of colors – depending on the nature of the inclusion.

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Red Mica Schist

Red Mica Schist

Red Mica Schist

The schists form a group of medium-grade metamorphic rocks, chiefly notable for the preponderance of lamellar minerals such as micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. Quartz often occurs in drawn-out grains to such an extent that a particular form called quartz schist is produced.

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Rose Quartz

Rose Quartz

Rose Quartz

Rose quartz is a type of quartz which exhibits a pale pink to rose red hue. The color is usually considered as due to trace amounts of titanium, iron, or manganese, in the massive material. Some rose quartz contains microscopic rutile needles which produces an asterism in transmitted light.

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Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz

Smoky quartz or smokey quartz is a brown to black variety of quartz caused through the natural (or artificial) irradiation of aluminium-containing rock crystal.

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Sodalite

Sodalite

Sodalite

Sodalite is a rich royal blue mineral widely enjoyed as an ornamental gemstone. Although massive sodalite samples are opaque, crystals are usually transparent to translucent. Sodalite is a member of the sodalite group and—together with hauyne, nosean, and lazurite—is a common constituent of lapis lazuli.

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Sodalite – hackmanite

Sodalite - hackmanite

Sodalite – hackmanite

Hackmanite is an important variety of sodalite exhibiting tenebrescence. When hackmanite from Mont Saint-Hilaire (Quebec) or Ilímaussaq (Greenland) is freshly quarried, it is generally pale to deep violet but the colour fades quickly to greyish or greenish white.

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Black Schorl Tourmaline

Schorl Tourmaline

Schorl Tourmaline

Black Schorl tourmaline, is the most common form of tourmaline, its chemistry is complex, and varies NaFe2,3Al6(BO3)3Si6)O18(OH)4.  Known since antiquity, used by ancient man for ceremony, modern uses included its pizeo-electric properties which played a major role in world war II in creating useful aircraft altimeters.  Minor use in jewelery also.

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Scapolite

sky blue scapolite, garnet and tremolite

sky blue scapolite, garnet and tremolite

This is a rock that was encountered during the making of our local highway, it consists of white and sky blue scapolite, brownish garnets and green tremolite.  The Blue scapolite is weakly fluorescent under SUV light.  It was found in Western Quebec.  It has no other use than as garden rock.

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